2018/2019 Key Dates
2018 Film Critics Awards News: Today, January 18, Winners from NationalAFC and GeorgiaFCA.

Sunday, February 11, 2018

30th Annual Scripter Award Winners


The authors and screenwriters behind the film Call Me by Your Name and the television The Handmaid's Tale received the 2018 USC Libraries Scripter Award in the February 10th ceremony at USC's Doheny Memorial Library.

In the film category, the winners were writer André Aciman, author of Call Me by Your Name, and screenwriter-director James Ivory, who adapted Aciman’s work for the screen.

In her welcoming remarks, USC Libraries Dean Catherine Quinlan paid tribute to the legacy of the Scripter Awards, “Scripter is celebrating its 30th birthday, and whether it’s your first Scripter or your thirtieth, I am grateful to everyone who has supported this fine, enduring Trojan tradition.

USC Provost Michael Quick hailed the importance of libraries. “More than places where students have a space to learn and faculty have collections from which to launch their scholarship, libraries are the core for what we stand for in higher education,” he said.

No doubt I appreciate libraries and the magnificent books you can find in some of the most famous libraries in the world; but,  also highly appreciate ebooks as they opened knowledge in a whole new level.  Wish there would be more digital libraries where anyone in the world could have access to knowledge, just as happens with physical buildings with books inside.  Sigh.

Winner is in *BLUE.  To check winners announcement at the official site go here.

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1/17/18
The USC Libraries have named the finalists for the 30th Annual USC Scripter Award. As has been announced in this particular competitive year, voting resulted in ties for film and television categories.

Due to a three-way tie in the nomination round, the writers of seven films and the works on which the films are based will compete for the honors this year.

Chaired by USC professor and past president of the Writers Guild of America, West, Howard Rodman, the 2018 Scripter selection committee selected the finalists from a field of 91 film and 28 television adaptations.

Since 1988, Scripter has honored the authors of printed works alongside the screenwriters who adapt their stories. In 2016, the USC Libraries inaugurated a new Scripter award, for television adaptation. Television and film finalists compete in separate categories.

These are the seven (7) film category finalists

*Author André Aciman and screenwriter James Ivory for Call Me By Your Name
Screenwriters Scott Neustadter and Michael H. Weber for The Disaster Artist, and authors Greg Sestero and Tom Bissell for their nonfiction book “The Disaster Artist: My Life Inside ‘The Room,’ the Greatest Bad Movie Ever Made
Screenwriters Scott Frank, Michael Green, and James Mangold, and authors Roy Thomas, Len Wein, and John Romita, Sr., for Logan
Screenwriter James Gray and author David Grann for The Lost City of Z
Screenwriter Aaron Sorkin and author Molly Bloom for Molly’s Game
Screenwriters Dee Rees and Virgil Williams and author Hillary Jordan for Mudbound
Screenwriter Allan Heinberg and author William Moulton Marston for Wonder Woman

To check all nominees, including television, go to official site here.  The USC Libraries will announce the winning authors and screenwriters at a black-tie ceremony on Saturday, February 10, 2018 in the historic Edward L. Doheny Memorial Library on the University Park campus of the University of Southern California.

Will not deny that Wonder Woman honor surprises me, but when you think about the movie it's easy to realize the script was also what helped movie to become the success (audiences and money) it became; perhaps the greatest script success was film being able to surpass regular superhero usual story to become more interesting and engaging.

As a reminder, the winner of this award usually goes to collect more honors, including the Oscar for Best Adapted Screenplay.

Worth mention is the honor given to one mesmerizing TV series, Mindhunter, not only because the story it tells about serial killers but also for how well tells about the beginnings of profiling.

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